Disclaimer

I am not a veterinarian. The health information provided on and accessible via this Blog is for informational purposes only and should not be considered to be healthcare advice, veterinary or medical diagnosis, treatment or prescribing of any kind. Additionally, none of this information should be considered a promise of benefits, a claim of cures, a legal warranty or a guarantee of results to be achieved. This information is not intended as a substitute for advice from your pet’s veterinarian or any other healthcare provider. You should not use this information for diagnosis or treatment of any disease, condition or health problem or for prescription of any medication, supplement or other treatment for your pet, yourself or any other person or animal. You should consult with a veterinarian before altering or discontinuing any of your pet’s current medications, treatment or care or starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program. You should also check with your pet’s veterinarian if you have or suspect he or she might have a health problem.

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Pet Snake Guide for Beginners



#1 CHOOSE A GOOD BEGINNER SNAKE. You might think any old snake will do, but you would be wrong. Many experts would recommend the corn snake, ball python, and kingsnake as good pet snakes.

#2 KNOW THE COMMITMENT. Just how long do snakes live? It depends on the species, but most snakes tend to live long lives. For example, corn snakes have a lifespan of 5-10 years, ball pythons can live for 20-30 years, and kingsnakes often live for 12-15 years. Make sure you do your research on the type of snake you want beforehand to determine if you're ready for the time commitment that comes with it.

#3 KNOW THE RISKS. We’re not just talking bites here (though the risk is small, accidents can happen). Snakes, like all reptiles, can carry Salmonella, which can leave you feeling quite ill (it’s not a good idea to have a snake with kids under five because of this). If you have children in the house, make sure they learn to wash their hands after handling the snake. And you? Wash your hands, too!

#4 UNDERSTAND WHAT SNAKES LIKE. Snakes are, by nature, typically solitary creatures. They most definitely do not enjoy crowds or loud noises, so you can just forget about taking them to see the latest Taylor Swift concert. And because of this solitary nature, it’s usually best to have just one snake per habitat. Try to keep the snake handling to a minimum, as most snakes aren't the touchy-feely type. However, you do need to handle your snake for about five minutes a day so it is accustomed to human contact. They also love consistency and routine (who knew?), so stick to the same routine for feeding, changing of water, and cleaning the tank.

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Thursday, January 12, 2017

How to Choose the Pet Bug That's Right for You



Like any pet, there’s a lot to consider with bug ownership—time, money and space being key concerns—and there are trendy pet bugs as much as their are trendy designer dogs. Ramsey’s journey began with books, and a lot of trial and error to figure out what kinds of food and living conditions different bugs required (errors oftentimes resulting in dead insects). Since his first pill bugs and earwigs, Ramsey has raised nine different species of praying mantis and several species of millipedes, spiders, and (really huge) stick insects, to name a few. Four giant silk moths currently flutter around his office space.

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